Tales of Neurosurgery: Aristo (384-322 B.C.)

Authors

  • Aykut Karasu Department Of Neurosurgery, Istanbul University, Istanbul Medical Faculty, Istanbul, Turkey.
  • Gülşat Aygen English Department, Northern Illinois University, Chicago, Usa.
  • Pulat Akın Sabancı Department Of Neurosurgery, Istanbul University, Istanbul Medical Faculty, Istanbul, Turkey.
  • Günseli Sağlam Department Of Anesthesiology, Istanbul University, Istanbul Medical Faculty, Istanbul, Turkey.
  • Erdinç Civelek Department Of Neurosurgery, Istanbul University, Istanbul Medical Faculty, Istanbul, Turkey.
  • Emad N. Eskandar Department Of Neurosurgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Usa.

Keywords:

Aristoteles, alexanderia, herophilus, spirit, history of medicine, history of anatomy, history of neuroscience

Abstract

This article presents an overview of Aristo’s identity as a philosopher and a scientist as well as his direct contribution to neurology, anatomy, physiology and his indirect effect on the developments in many other sciences including, astronomy and philology by founding the Library in Alexandria. The major contribution of this article is the discussion on the influence of Aristo’s philosophy on his explanations and claims in neurology, particularly his assertion that the heart as the seat of consciousness and sensations, not the brain as his philosopher predecessor Plato and the medical expert Hippocrates had argued.

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.

Published

2008-12-30

How to Cite

1.
Karasu A, Aygen G, Sabancı PA, Sağlam G, Civelek E, Eskandar EN. Tales of Neurosurgery: Aristo (384-322 B.C.). J Nervous Sys Surgery [Internet]. 2008 Dec. 30 [cited 2024 Feb. 24];1(4):264-7. Available from: https://sscdergisi.org/index.php/sscd/article/view/183

Issue

Section

Letter to Editor