Lumbar Disc Herniation Causing Phantom Limb Pain in the Amputated Patient

Authors

  • Necati Üçler Firat University Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery, Elazig, Turkiye.
  • Adnan Yalçın Demirci Doctor Munif Islamoglu State Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery, Kastamonu, Turkiye.
  • Bekir Akgün Firat University Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery, Elazig, Turkiye.
  • Serdal Albayrak Elazig Education And Research Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery, Elazig, Turkiye.

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.5222/sscd.2014.185

Keywords:

Amputation, phantom pain, lumbar disc herniation

Abstract

Phantom limb pain is a common pain in the amputated patiens but there is a decrease in frequency and intensity of phantom pain with time. Persistently increased or changed phantom pain may be caused by other pathologies rather than amputated limb. We presented a 70-year-old man who was seen for worsening phantom pain in his left leg. Our physical examination and radiological studies showed the presence of a left-central lumbar disc herniation at L2-3 intervertabral level. After microdiscectomy operation, his pain was relieved. We aimed to emphasize that lumbar disc pathologies may cause new onset pain in the patients with amputated limb and should importantly take a place in the differential diagnosis of phantom pain in amputated patients.

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Published

2014-12-30

How to Cite

1.
Üçler N, Demirci AY, Akgün B, Albayrak S. Lumbar Disc Herniation Causing Phantom Limb Pain in the Amputated Patient. J Nervous Sys Surgery [Internet]. 2014 Dec. 30 [cited 2022 Jan. 16];4(4):185-7. Available from: https://sscdergisi.org/index.php/sscd/article/view/117

Issue

Section

Case Report